The Architectural Triumph of the Parthenon

The Architectural Triumph of the Parthenon

The Parthenon is a ruin to this day. Some of its sculptures were lost forever when collectors ransacked the site in the 18th and 19th centuries. Many more sculptures lie in museums throughout Europe. Yet what still stands on the Acropolis, visible for miles around, remains an awe-inspiring monument to the Golden Age of ancient Greece.

The Architectural Triumph of the Parthenon

By Mr Ghaz, April 10, 2011

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The Architectural Triumph of the Parthenon

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On the evening of September 26, 1687, a massive explosion sent a column of fire and smoke into the sky above Athens. A shell from the artillery of the Venetian general Francesco Morosini, besieging the city’s Turkish occupiers, had landed in the enemy’s powder store. The siege was over and the Turks defeated-but the glory of ancient Greek architecture, the Parthenon, was in ruins. It was within the walls of this temple, built 2,100 years earlier, that the Turks had placed their ammunition and gunpowder.

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The Parthenon is a ruin to this day. Some of its sculptures were lost forever when collectors ransacked the site in the 18th and 19th centuries. Many more sculptures lie in museums throughout Europe. Yet what still stands on the Acropolis, visible for miles around, remains an awe-inspiring monument to the Golden Age of ancient Greece.

Image Credit

It was Pericles, leader of Athens from 461 to 429 B.C., who proposed building a majestic new temple to the city’s patron goddess. Athens was the center of an empire, and Pericles was determined that some visible symbol of its wealth and influence be erected. Not only would the new temple house a magnificent gold and ivory statue of Athena, it would also serve as the treasury of the empire.

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The Parthenon consists of three basic parts: a colonnade on all four sides, called the naos. The naos was divided into two parts: one for the statue of Athena, the other for the treasury.

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18 Comments
ceegirl, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

very good information

ken bultman, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

Very detailed info regarding the construction of the structure. Great photos. I’ve seen what is presumed to be a replica in Tennessee. Awesome.

revivor, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

interesting, I have never been to Athens but this article brings me a little closer!!

Francois Hagnere, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

An illuminating article on a true wonder. Illustrations are fabulous. Congratulations my friend.

Payge, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

Absolutely fabulous article and photos to match as well.I like this type of history and Greek history as a general rule.I will never see it in my lifetime but thanks to you I know more about it.

Amanda, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

Some of the sculptures were also broken down over time to be used as lime, as building materials.

Citra Florenca, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

Very detailed and thorough article. It always amazes me how the ancient people build such a great architectural project. Parthenon is one of the places I want to visit before I die.

Ruby Hawk, posted this comment on Apr 22nd, 2010

Thank you Mr.Ghaz for the tour. I would love to see it in person.

ronthoughts, posted this comment on Apr 23rd, 2010

It is a real beauty my friend.
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Christine Ramsay, posted this comment on Apr 23rd, 2010

A really interesting look at the building and history of this beautiful monument. It is a striking piece of archtecture. Well done.

Christine

mikky webs, posted this comment on Apr 23rd, 2010

Oh my goodness! This is really architectural and real. I pray they never go extinct.

CHAN LEE PENG, posted this comment on Apr 23rd, 2010

Beautiful architectural structures. They’re spectacular! Well done! Clicked you “liked it”

Susan, posted this comment on Apr 23rd, 2010

We sure don’t build like we used too! Obviously this building was created to stand forever.

monica55, posted this comment on Apr 24th, 2010

Excellent and interesting article. I have always been amazed at the architecture of the ancient Greeks. Great work Ghazali.
Monica.

deep blue, posted this comment on Apr 24th, 2010

Very well presented, Mr Ghaz.

wonder, posted this comment on Apr 24th, 2010

How the people could endeavour to make them with such little facility is a wonder.Great article to go through.

MJ Sunderland, posted this comment on Apr 27th, 2010

Excellent work.

BeatsMe, posted this comment on Apr 27th, 2010

Thanks for a detailed description of The Parthenon.

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